About Us

Slide
About ACCA

Board of Directors

Paul R. Camping

Paul R. Camping

Caribou
Retired

Justin Selfridge

Justin Selfridge

Connor

Andrew Ketch

Andrew Ketch

Woodland
Farmer

Rob Kieffer

Rob Kieffer

Caribou
Real Estate Agent

Ben LeBlanc

Ben LeBlanc

Mapleton
Self Employed

Brandon Saucier

Brandon Saucier

Connor
Self Employed

Elected Officers

Jerry McLaughlin

President

Jerry McLaughlin

President

New Sweden
Maine Guide

Dwight Junkins

Vice President

Dwight Junkins

Vice President

Ashland
Retired

David Farnum

Treasurer

David Farnum

Treasurer

Portage
Retired

Adam Jandreau

Secretary

Adam Jandreau

Secretary

Caribou
Maine Guide

Aroostook County Conservation Association (ACCA)

Our mission and purpose is to “preserve, protect, and enhance the whitetail deer herd in Aroostook County.” We strive to enhance wildlife and fisheries habitat, to encourage the wise use of these resources, and encourage landowner partnerships to accomplish these goals. We will educate and encourage youth by providing them with experiences to assist in wildlife and fisheries conservation and management and to promote sporting opportunities for future generations. We work with government agencies, commercial and private landowners, businesses and individuals with management efforts on predator control and winter survival efforts on whitetail deer, moose, and other wildlife.

Traditional deer yarding areas in Aroostook County are showing loses of 65-85%. Therefore, our initial efforts are focusing on establishing food plots for whitetail deer, which will also attract and support a variety of wildlife species. These food plots will enhance existing habitat by caloric intake prior to the long winter season.

The Ultimate Food Plot

You can make any piece of deer habitat better. Even small efforts made in improving the quality of food available will be rewarded. First, better nutrition, even on a small scale, will promote a healthier herd. In areas that lack adequate food, such an effort can make a big difference. But, even in the richest farm country where deer are never hungry for long, a well-chosen and well-situated food plot can attract and hold deer.

Food plots are pivotal to most deer management plans. but, simply scratching the earth and throwing out a little seed isn’t going to produce fat deer or more fawns. We should first realize that forage quality is site-specific and directly correlates to soil and climate. Always remember two important aspects of deer nutrition: There is no such thing as a quick solution, and no single plant can provide quality forage everywhere or during all times of the year.

Balance is the Key

Ideally, you will be able to plant a variety of foods that deer prefer at different times of the year so that there is always something attractive on their plate. Without adequate acreage the deer will wipe out each seasonal planting before it even has chance to produce benefits. The most important point to remember regarding food plots is that SUPPLEMENTAL FOODS ARE NOT A MEANS TO REPLACE FEEDING. They are designed to even out the nutritional deficiencies of an area throughout the year. Generally there are two major stress periods for deer: winter and late summer. Northern hunters would best be advised to address the winter stress period for their management plan. Suffice it to say that most of us will never be able to do everything we would like to do to improve nutrition, so we need to set some realistic goals and scale our plans accordingly. Planning and planting one or two small food plots – about five-acres total – every year is a realistic starting point.

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